Ron Santini Photography: Blog https://www.ronsantiniphotography.com/blog en-us (C) Ron Santini Photography rsantini527@gmail.com (Ron Santini Photography) Thu, 14 Apr 2022 20:56:00 GMT Thu, 14 Apr 2022 20:56:00 GMT https://www.ronsantiniphotography.com/img/s/v-12/u486485055-o703908515-50.jpg Ron Santini Photography: Blog https://www.ronsantiniphotography.com/blog 94 120 The Art of Glass Blowing in the Pacific Northwest https://www.ronsantiniphotography.com/blog/2022/4/the-art-of-glass-blowing-in-the-pacific-northwest Slide1Slide1

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A series of photo taken at the Avalon Glassworks, 2914 SW Avalon Way, Seattle, WA 98126 follows. Avalon Glassworks is a glass art gallery and working hot shop where you can talk to the artists, see the process, and buy gifts of glasswork made on-site. Free demos 5 days a week.

 

glass artist at workAn artist working the glass.A glass artist pulling out hot glass from the molten glass furnace.

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The art of glass blowingHere are two glass artisians working as a team to create what will be a pimpkin.

Avalon GlassworksCreating an apple!Here is an artesian starting to create a glass apple.

Avalon GlassworksThe apple taking shapeThe apple is glowing hot, but taking the final form.

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Avalon Glassworks - Finished AppleThe finished product!The apple is finished and will now be placed in the annealing oven to cool before it is ready for display.

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Chihuly Garden and Glass

305 Harrison Street

Seattle, Washington 98109

 

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rsantini527@gmail.com (Ron Santini Photography) and artists avalon chihuly dale garden glass glassblowing glassworks seattle washington https://www.ronsantiniphotography.com/blog/2022/4/the-art-of-glass-blowing-in-the-pacific-northwest Thu, 14 Apr 2022 20:55:58 GMT
Death Valley National Park: A Land of Extreme Environments https://www.ronsantiniphotography.com/blog/2022/3/death-valley-national-park-a-land-of-extreme-environments  

 

Death Valley National Park

A Land of Extreme Environments

 

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Death Valley National Park originally was designated as a national monument in 1933 and became a national park in 1994.  It is a valley of extremes: extreme temperatures, extreme environments, extreme weather conditions and extreme size.

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Artists Point

 

Temperatures in Death Valley National Park are frequent and extreme. On July 10, 1913, the US Weather Bureau recorded a temperature of 134 oF at Greenland Ranch (now Furnace Creek) in Death Valley. This temperature stands as the highest ambient temperature recorded at the surface on Planet Earth. The average high temperature in Death Valley National Park generally occurs in July around 117 oF, and the average low temperature occurs in December at 66 oF. Death Valley National Park averages about 2 inches of rainfall/year. During my visit there in December, I had the opportunity to experience a rare climactic event.

 

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Rain, Snow, Snow Capped Peaks and Sunshine

 

What I witnessed were snow peaked mountains, snow, rain, and sunshine all occurring at the same time.  An extreme event for sure, but a nature and landscape photographer’s dream!

Elevations in Death Valley National Park range from a low of 282 feet below mean sea level (msl) at Badwater Basin to 11,048 feet above msl at Telescope Peak. This dramatic change has created extreme environments from snowcapped mountains to dried up salt flats, sand dunes and flood-driven canyons.

 

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Salt Flats

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Mesquite Sand Dunes

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Plants will grow in harsh environments

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Sunrise at Zabriskie Point

 

The geology of Death Valley National Park is quite fascinating and has a complex geologic history way too long to explain in detail in this article. (Insert Rock Formation Photo) Suffice to say Death Valley is composed of ancient seas, warped mountains, volcanic activity, with much of this created by erosion and deposition. For example, beneath Badwater Basin lies more than 11,000 feet of accumulated sediment and salts.

The extremes of climatic changes are no stranger to Death Valley. During the last major Ice Age, the valley was part of a vast system of lakes. These lakes disappeared approximately 10,000 years ago and left behind vast fields of salt deposits. Sodium chloride, table salt, makes up the majority of the salts found in Badwater basin. (Insert Photos of Salt Deposit-1 or-2) About 2100 years ago a volcanic explosion created the Ubehebe Crater, (Insert Ubehebe Crater-1 or-2) an interaction between the hot, molten materials coming in contact with groundwater.

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Looking into Uehebe Crater

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A trail around Uehebe Crater

The size of Death Valley National Park is the largest national park in the lower 48 states at 5,270mi2.

In closing I will say the visit to Death Valley National Park was fascinating to photograph in a stark, desert environment, but one that begs a return to capture more of this extreme place. 

 

 

Please visit these social media sites to view more of Ron’s photography.

 

 

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rsantini527@gmail.com (Ron Santini Photography) death desert dunes environments extreme flats geology national park salt sand valley https://www.ronsantiniphotography.com/blog/2022/3/death-valley-national-park-a-land-of-extreme-environments Tue, 01 Mar 2022 20:36:04 GMT
Tips for Photographing the Milky Way https://www.ronsantiniphotography.com/blog/2021/7/tips-for-photographing-the-milky-way 2022 Milky Way Calendar BODIE ISLAND LH-1BODIE ISLAND LH-1

 

One of the fun things to do with your camera is to photograph the night sky. You can start with photographing the Milky Way, stars, and star trails. As you get better at the process you can add light painting into the mix to create foreground interest. This blog is about photographing the Milky Way and provides many useful tips for capturing it. Please leaves comments below, and please subscribe to my blog by clicking on the "Subscribe" button at the top right. Thanks for taking time time to read this blog.

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MILKY WAY PHOTOGRAPHY TIP SHEET (1)

  • EQUIPMENT
  • Camera
  • Lens
  • Lens Dew Heater (Chemical hand warmer and rubberband work well)
  • Tripod
  • Intervalometer/remote cable release
  • Gaffers Tape
  • Head Lamp/Flashlight w/red & white colors)
  • Smartphone with a star map app installed

Best Time of Year to Photograph the Milky Way (2)

  • In the Northern Hemisphere from March through September
  • In the Southern Hemisphere from March through September

Location

  • Dark location away from light pollution sources

Camera Type

  • Most any DSLR or Mirrorless camera should work
  • Note: Entry-level cameras may introduce too much noise in final images

Lens

  • 14mm – 24mm

Aperture: f/2.8 or lower for best results

  • Tripod
  • Sturdy and at a height that you can view the Milky Way without extending the center column.
  • Good sturdy ball head that locks down and prevents securely preventing camera drift.

Intervalometer

  • Allows you to set the exposure time and snap a picture without touching the camera shutter button.
  • Many newer cameras have intervalometers built-in. Know how to operate BEFORE arriving at a shoot.

Gaffers Tape

  • Used to tape down the focus ring once you have obtained focus. This prevents accidental movement of the focus ring once you have it set. Used for navigating in the dark and reading camera settings.

Head Lamp/Flashlight

  • If you have both bring them. Both should preferably have a red light option. Once your eyes are adapted to the dark, the red light allows navigating in the dark and making camera adjustments. The red light allows you to see in the dark without disturbing your dark-adapted eyes.

Smartphone Star App

  • Used to locate individual stars, planets, and galaxies
  • Stellarium (Android)
  • Sky Guide (iOS)
  • Photo Pills
  • PlanIt, PlanIt Live, PlanIt Pro
  • The Photographer’s Ephemeris (Android)
  • Clear Outside

Procedure for Taking Milky Way Photographs

  • Set Up Your Camera
  • Set your camera to capture RAW images
  • If using a telephoto lens such as a 16-35mm, zoom out its widest extent
  • Set your camera to MANUAL FOCUS
  • Set your camera to MANUAL EXPOSURE
  • Set your camera self-timer to 2 seconds
  • Optional: Set your camera to BULB MODE.
  • Start at ISO 3200 and adjust accordingly.
  • Disable Long Exposure Noise Reduction
  • Enable the camera’s histogram
  • Milky Way Exposure Calculator (3)

Determine If using an intervalometer, set it to it using the Rule of 500 or NPF Rule (4,5)

SS = 500/(CF x FL)

SS = Shutter Speed

CF = If use a crop sensor camera

FL = Focal Length you have your lens set to

Example: Canon 7D with Crop Sensor of 1.4, lens focal length is 16mm

              SS = 500/(1.4 x 16) = 22.32 seconds = 22 seconds

              Set intervalometer to 22 seconds

Example: Canon R5 with a full-frame sensor, lens focal length is 16mm

              SS = 500/16 = 31.25 seconds = 31 seconds 

Set intervalometer to 30 seconds (Generally speaking, exposures over 30 seconds start to introduce star trails in your photo).

NOTE: Some folks use the 300 Rule (4) for setting exposure length and others use the NPF Rule (5)

Focusing in the dark

  • Manual focus on a distant star with Live View.
  • Autofocus on a flashlight at a distance of at least 100-150 ft from the camera.
  • Focus on a distance object >150 ft away in the daylight
  • Take a test shot to determine focus. Adjust as necessary and repeat.
  • Once the focus is set, tape down the focus ring with Gaffers Tape to prevent focus ring movement.

Compose Your Shot

  • Compose your shot. Depending on your method of choice, press the intervalometer button, remote camera release, or camera shutter button, to capture your image.
  • Review your photography adjust settings as necessary and reshoot.
  • You can also stack multiple images in post-processing by taking between 5-10 photos in succession once you have a final composition and settings.

References:

1. How to Photograph the Milky Way – Lonely Speck

2. 2022 Milky Way Calendar 

3.  Milky Way Exposure Calculator - Xavier Jubier (free.fr)

4. Brady Cabe Photographer Central California photography | The 500 and 300 Rule For Photographing The Night Sky

5. NPF: What Is The NPF Rule And How To Use It For Brilliant Star Photography? (lightstalking.com)

 

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rsantini527@gmail.com (Ron Santini Photography) How to Milky Way Night Sky Photographing the Milky Way Tips for Photographing the Milky Way https://www.ronsantiniphotography.com/blog/2021/7/tips-for-photographing-the-milky-way Fri, 02 Jul 2021 15:23:19 GMT
Never Forget https://www.ronsantiniphotography.com/blog/2021/5/never-forget I spent the afternoon at a Veterans Cemetery in Salisbury, NC photographing scenes and speaking with visitors. Please take a few minutes to view aand honor these fallen brothers and sisters.

 

Memorial Day 2021

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rsantini527@gmail.com (Ron Santini Photography) 2021 Cemetery Day Memorial National Salisbury https://www.ronsantiniphotography.com/blog/2021/5/never-forget Mon, 31 May 2021 23:01:21 GMT
Interesting Facts About Alligators https://www.ronsantiniphotography.com/blog/2021/5/interesting-facts-about-alligators Here is a link to an article I created about alligators. Read, enjoy and share. Thanks for taking the time to view!!

 

Interesting Facts About Alligators
 

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rsantini527@gmail.com (Ron Santini Photography) alligators nature wildlife https://www.ronsantiniphotography.com/blog/2021/5/interesting-facts-about-alligators Thu, 13 May 2021 13:29:24 GMT